Home Community EPA violations in the Northwest: Fish farms and fishing vessels pollute

Fish Farms Pollute

(Source: EPA, 12/5/2103) –A Twin Falls commercial fish and frog farm has settled with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for repeatedly violating the Clean Water Act and polluting the Snake River in South-central Idaho.

McCollum Enterprises, Limited Partnership, operates the aquaculture facility known as the Canyon Springs Fish Farm located near Twin Falls, Idaho. The facility raises Tilapia and American Bullfrogs commercially, supplying fish markets and wholesalers with fresh fish and frogs across the Northwest. From June 2008 to March 2012, EPA identified over 550 violations of the facility’s discharge permit, including numerous releases of phosphorus-laden wastewater. To settle the violations, McCollum Enterprises has agreed to pay a $25,000 penalty.  Outside of the settlement, the company has also invested in facility improvements that have significantly reduced fish mortalities and phosphorus pollution to the Snake River.

A Twin Falls commercial fish and frog farm has settled with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for repeatedly violating the Clean Water Act and polluting the Snake River in South-central Idaho.

McCollum Enterprises, Limited Partnership, operates the aquaculture facility known as the Canyon Springs Fish Farm located near Twin Falls, Idaho. The facility raises Tilapia and American Bullfrogs commercially, supplying fish markets and wholesalers with fresh fish and frogs across the Northwest. From June 2008 to March 2012, EPA identified over 550 violations of the facility’s discharge permit, including numerous releases of phosphorus-laden wastewater. To settle the violations, McCollum Enterprises has agreed to pay a $25,000 penalty.  Outside of the settlement, the company has also invested in facility improvements that have significantly reduced fish mortalities and phosphorus pollution to the Snake River.

Fish Vessels Pollute

(Source: EPA, 12/5/2103) — Rabaul Diesel Inc., of Seattle, Washington (also known as RDI Marine) has agreed to pay penalties and replace or modify six marine diesel engines that violated federal clean air rules.  The engines were installed on six commercial fishing vessels destined for use in Alaska’s Bristol Bay.

According to settlement details, the six diesel engines were certified for recreational, not commercial use. Title II of the federal Clean Air Act requires that only engines that are certified for commercial operation be installed in new commercial vessels. The different requirements for recreational and commercial marine diesel engines reflect how much air pollution the engines may produce when used as designated over the course of their lifetime.

RDI Marine has agreed to replace the engines with compliant engines or modify the engines to make them identical in all respects to compliant commercial engines.  As part of the settlement, RDI Marine also agreed to pay a $39,000 civil penalty.

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